Reading on the screen
1 min read

Reading on the screen

These are small things that some time ago were considered so minor that we did not pay attention. Getting into books and exploring the journeys they offer balanced these off.

Books have magic.

Smell of a new book you just bought.

Feel of fresh paper.

Sound of pages.

Excitement as you read through table of content.

All that stuff.

Yet, books became uncomfortable. In the same way I do not bring my vinyls to listen during my runs or commutes, I do not bring books to place where I can potentially read. Books require light and space. You need light room or a lamp to see text. You also need enough space to be able to open your book and have freedom of movement to turn pages. You need certain body position to hold the book. The book also exposes whatever you are reading to others — in case if you prefer to have privacy. Finally, you have to go and buy them. Or wait until they are delivered.

These are small things that some time ago were considered so minor that we did not pay attention. Getting into books and exploring the journeys they offer balanced these off.

Digital portable screens changed that. Not only you can download books in a matter of few clicks, you can read the content in total darkness, lying under your blanket, standing on a bus, without any movement except for scrolling or swiping with one finger. This opens opportunities for more reading that were not available before.

Having a chance to live in a different non-digitized world, still digital books for me are just that — screens with content. They do democratize reading: I have more access to books and I read more than ever. Just as with music, however, when there is something of highest pleasure and quality, I go and buy paper books. Paper for books is becoming what vinyl became for music — niche form of consumption, artifacts for enthusiasts and analogue lovers.